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(2005): I developed this monkey indirect calorimeter at the State University of New York-Downstate. I designed a special metabolic cage to provide comfort for the monkeys while allowing maximum air circulation without the utilization of internal fans. Hartman & Braun Optima Series analyzers were utilized for metabolic measurements.

Bonnet Macaque monkeys are utilized as a human model for determining the causes of obesity. This necessitated the development of the first monkey whole room indirect calorimeter for accurate metabolic measurements in 2005.

Monkeys were transferred into this specialty designed metabolic cage in another room and then brought into the room calorimeter lab to be placed within the monkey indirect calorimeter chamber (left) by just rolling it up the ramp (right).

(2000): Updated infant whole room indirect calorimeter I developed at Miami Children’s Hospital, Department of Research. Climate control was provided by a hospital blanket cooler (center). Hartman & Braun upgraded instrumentation was utilized (right). Notice the gloveless interaction ports to provide more natural parental/care giver interaction with infants during metabolic measurements (left).

Parental/care giver interaction during metabolic measurements utilizing the new gloveless access ports in the upgraded infant indirect calorimeter. Greater natural contact between infants and their parents/care givers further reduces anxiety due to separation, thus improving the accuracy of metabolic measurements.

(1996): I developed the worlds first practical whole room indirect calorimeter at Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics in 1996. This measured all the components of energy expenditure including physical activity. Notice the gloves that allowed interaction with the infants by parents/care givers during metabolic measurements and the balance below the bed platform for measurement of infant physical activity.

Example of parental/caregiver interaction during infant metabolic measurements utilizing the first ever infant whole room indirect calorimeter. This was the first attempt to reduce infant anxiety due to separation from parents/care givers.

This two-year old child weighs just 4 kg and is an example of the growing problem of childhood primary/secondary malnutrition in many countries of the world. In 2003 I set up an infant whole room indirect calorimeter within the pediatric department at the Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil for measurement of all the components of energy expenditure in malnourished infants and children. This enabled much improved nutritional rehabilitation which led to faster recoveries.

(1994): Rodent indirect calorimeter I developed at Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, featuring a chamber whereby a rodent metabolic cage could be inserted. The entire enclosure rests on top of a balance to measure physical activity. Utilizing the metabolic cage enabled measurement of all the components of rodent energy expenditure. Rodents up to 500 grams could be placed within the internal metabolic cage.

(1985): First rodent multi-chamber indirect calorimeter I developed at the University of Arizona, Department of Nutrition in 1985. The system utilized Ametek analyzers and an Apple 2e computer. Notice the inserted Nalgene rodent metabolic cages thus allowing measurement of all the components of rodent energy expenditure in up to four rodents simultaneously.

(1993): I developed the first indirect calorimeter for poultry at the University of Arizona, Department of Nutrition, in 1983. It featured multiple chambers that housed two laying hens each. Used refrigerators were utilized since they already had a cooling system. Furthermore, they allowed development of the system at greatly reduced costs. The system utilized Ametek analyzers and an Apple 2e computer.

Inside of the poultry indirect calorimeter chamber. Each chamber housed two laying hens.

(2005): I developed this monkey indirect calorimeter at the State University of New York-Downstate. I designed a special metabolic cage to provide comfort for the monkeys while allowing maximum air circulation without the utilization of internal fans. Hartman & Braun Optima Series analyzers were utilized for metabolic measurements.

Bonnet Macaque monkeys are utilized as a human model for determining the causes of obesity. This necessitated the development of the first monkey whole room indirect calorimeter for accurate metabolic measurements in 2005.

Monkeys were transferred into this specialty designed metabolic cage in another room and then brought into the room calorimeter lab to be placed within the monkey indirect calorimeter chamber (left) by just rolling it up the ramp (right).

(2000): Updated infant whole room indirect calorimeter I developed at Miami Children’s Hospital, Department of Research. Climate control was provided by a hospital blanket cooler (center). Hartman & Braun upgraded instrumentation was utilized (right). Notice the gloveless interaction ports to provide more natural parental/care giver interaction with infants during metabolic measurements (left).

Parental/care giver interaction during metabolic measurements utilizing the new gloveless access ports in the upgraded infant indirect calorimeter. Greater natural contact between infants and their parents/care givers further reduces anxiety due to separation, thus improving the accuracy of metabolic measurements.

(1996): I developed the worlds first practical whole room indirect calorimeter at Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics in 1996. This measured all the components of energy expenditure including physical activity. Notice the gloves that allowed interaction with the infants by parents/care givers during metabolic measurements and the balance below the bed platform for measurement of infant physical activity.

Example of parental/caregiver interaction during infant metabolic measurements utilizing the first ever infant whole room indirect calorimeter. This was the first attempt to reduce infant anxiety due to separation from parents/care givers.

This two-year old child weighs just 4 kg and is an example of the growing problem of childhood primary/secondary malnutrition in many countries of the world. In 2003 I set up an infant whole room indirect calorimeter within the pediatric department at the Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil for measurement of all the components of energy expenditure in malnourished infants and children. This enabled much improved nutritional rehabilitation which led to faster recoveries.

(1994): Rodent indirect calorimeter I developed at Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, featuring a chamber whereby a rodent metabolic cage could be inserted. The entire enclosure rests on top of a balance to measure physical activity. Utilizing the metabolic cage enabled measurement of all the components of rodent energy expenditure. Rodents up to 500 grams could be placed within the internal metabolic cage.

(1985): First rodent multi-chamber indirect calorimeter I developed at the University of Arizona, Department of Nutrition in 1985. The system utilized Ametek analyzers and an Apple 2e computer. Notice the inserted Nalgene rodent metabolic cages thus allowing measurement of all the components of rodent energy expenditure in up to four rodents simultaneously.

(1983): I developed the first indirect calorimeter for poultry at the University of Arizona, Department of Nutrition, in 1983. It featured multiple chambers that housed two laying hens each. Used refrigerators were utilized since they already had a cooling system. Furthermore, they allowed development of the system at greatly reduced costs. The system utilized Ametek analyzers and an Apple 2e computer.

Inside of the poultry indirect calorimeter chamber. Each chamber housed two laying hens.

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D & S Consulting Services Inc. advertising pamphlets placed on each seating position at the meeting. Approximately 200 people attended this meeting.

The video of Dr. Russell Rising presenting his oral presentation.

All the key note speakers whom presented at the meeting.

All the key note speakers whom presented at the meeting.

D & S Consulting Services Inc. advertising pamphlets placed on each seating position at the meeting. Approximately 200 people attended this meeting.

The video of Dr. Russell Rising presenting his oral presentation.

D & S Consulting Services Inc. sponsor booth. D & S was a gold level sponsor of the meeting, along with Sable Systems International, a working partner.

Mr. Dennis Loleng (center) and the Sable Systems International representatives on either side at the sponsor booth. Sable Systems International provides the integrated metabolic instrumentation for the room calorimeters.

RACMEM meeting banquet attended by 250 people. There were awards given for best poster and oral presentations.

All Gold and Platinum sponsors had their company logos displayed on a large screen during the banquet.

Dr. Shijia Pan presenting a special live key note address from the Shanghai National Center for Translational Medicine, Ruijin Hospital during the main scientific session of the meeting.

Ms. Jennifer Muse presenting her poster at the RACMEM meeting. She was one of two students sponsored by D & S to attend the meeting and present their work.

D & S Consulting Services Inc. had a total of five poster presentations at the RACMEM meeting. Two of them were presented by students sponsored by the company.

Dr. Rebecca Dörner, the other student from Germany sponsored by D & S, winning the best poster presentation competition and a $1000.00 prize at the RACMEM meeting. Dr. Russell Rising was a co-author on the winning poster.

Dr. Russell Rising, a key note speaker at the meeting, presenting his work entitled “Short Duration Metabolic Measurements by Whole room Indirect Calorimetry as an Adjunct for Obesity Treatment and Athletic Training.”

Dr. Russell Rising, a key note speaker at the meeting, presenting his work entitled “Short Duration Metabolic Measurements by Whole room Indirect Calorimetry as an Adjunct for Obesity Treatment and Athletic Training.”

Dr. Rebecca Dörner, the other student from Germany sponsored by D & S, winning the best poster presentation competition and a $1000.00 prize at the RACMEM meeting. Dr. Russell Rising was a co-author on the winning poster.

D & S Consulting Services Inc. had a total of five poster presentations at the RACMEM meeting. Two of them were presented by students sponsored by the company.

Ms. Jennifer Muse presenting her poster at the RACMEM meeting. She was one of two students sponsored by D & S to attend the meeting and present their work.

Dr. Shijia Pan presenting a special live key note address from the Shanghai National Center for Translational Medicine, Ruijin Hospital during the main scientific session of the meeting.

All Gold and Platinum sponsors had their company logos displayed on a large screen during the banquet.

RACMEM meeting banquet attended by 250 people. There were awards given for best poster and oral presentations.

Mr. Dennis Loleng (center) and the Sable Systems International representatives on either side at the sponsor booth. Sable Systems International provides the integrated metabolic instrumentation for the room calorimeters.

D & S Consulting Services Inc. sponsor booth. D & S was a gold level sponsor of the meeting, along with Sable Systems International, a working partner.

Click photo to see video

Click photo to see video

Click photo to see video

Click photo to see video